Pilates Teachers' Manual

Special Guest - Martin Reid

December 10, 2020 Olivia Bioni, Martin Reid Season 3 Episode 13
Pilates Teachers' Manual
Special Guest - Martin Reid
Chapters
0:00
Welcome
2:10
Finding Pilates
6:42
Advice for Teachers
9:45
Working with Resistant Clients
11:41
Origins of Personal Victory
16:20
Real Men Do Pilates
27:08
Core Conversations
29:26
Flowing in Your Gift
Pilates Teachers' Manual
Special Guest - Martin Reid
Dec 10, 2020 Season 3 Episode 13
Olivia Bioni, Martin Reid

Martin Reid is on the podcast today! He shares his Pilates journey, how he helps his clients reach their podium performance, the importance of representation, his passion for getting men involved in Pilates, and about finding and flowing in his gift. Martin is an awesome teacher, movement specialist, and  host of Core Conversations podcast. Check out more of his offerings in the show notes below! 

I want to hear from you! Share your thoughts and follow the podcast on Instagram and Facebook @pilatesteachersmanual. Full show notes, episode transcription, and chapter markers can be found on the podcast website here: http://bit.ly/pilatesteachersmanual. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast for updates, and rate and review wherever you listen!  Episodes now available on YouTube: *https://bit.ly/YouTubePTM

Email [email protected] with your feedback.   

Show Notes:

Martin Reid is the founder of Reid Method Pilates in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. He hosts Core Conversations podcasts live on his Instagram @personalvictory weekdays at 10am  Eastern. Check out @realmendopilates and his podcast here:  *https://coreconversatinonspodcast.podbean.com/*

Support the podcast:    

Visit https://links.oliviabioni.com/affiliates to take advantage of some sweet savings! 

Episode Music: 

This episode uses NCS music in compliance with https://ncs.io/usage-policy

Track: Tobu - Good Times [NCS Release]
Music provided by NoCopyrightSounds.
Watch: https://youtu.be/YHSH9k9ooZY
Free Download / Stream: http://ncs.io/goodtimes

Track: Tobu & Itro - Sunburst [NCS Release]
Music provided by NoCopyrightSounds.
Watch: https://youtu.be/4lXBHD5C8do



Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/oliviapodcasts)

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Martin Reid is on the podcast today! He shares his Pilates journey, how he helps his clients reach their podium performance, the importance of representation, his passion for getting men involved in Pilates, and about finding and flowing in his gift. Martin is an awesome teacher, movement specialist, and  host of Core Conversations podcast. Check out more of his offerings in the show notes below! 

I want to hear from you! Share your thoughts and follow the podcast on Instagram and Facebook @pilatesteachersmanual. Full show notes, episode transcription, and chapter markers can be found on the podcast website here: http://bit.ly/pilatesteachersmanual. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast for updates, and rate and review wherever you listen!  Episodes now available on YouTube: *https://bit.ly/YouTubePTM

Email [email protected] with your feedback.   

Show Notes:

Martin Reid is the founder of Reid Method Pilates in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. He hosts Core Conversations podcasts live on his Instagram @personalvictory weekdays at 10am  Eastern. Check out @realmendopilates and his podcast here:  *https://coreconversatinonspodcast.podbean.com/*

Support the podcast:    

Visit https://links.oliviabioni.com/affiliates to take advantage of some sweet savings! 

Episode Music: 

This episode uses NCS music in compliance with https://ncs.io/usage-policy

Track: Tobu - Good Times [NCS Release]
Music provided by NoCopyrightSounds.
Watch: https://youtu.be/YHSH9k9ooZY
Free Download / Stream: http://ncs.io/goodtimes

Track: Tobu & Itro - Sunburst [NCS Release]
Music provided by NoCopyrightSounds.
Watch: https://youtu.be/4lXBHD5C8do



Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/oliviapodcasts)

 Olivia: [00:00:00] Welcome to Pilates Teachers' Manual, your guide to becoming a great Pilates teacher. I'm Olivia, and I'll be your host. Join the conversation and the Pilates community on Instagram at @pilatesteachersmanual and visit buymeacoffee.com/OliviaPodcasts to support the show. Today's chapter starts now.

So today I'm joined by Martin Reid and I am [00:01:00] so excited to have him on the podcast. I was just on his Core Conversations show on Instagram last week. If you haven't checked it out, you definitely should over at his Instagram at @personalvictory. I will link that in the show notes so that you can find it and follow him.

So Martin, tell me a little bit about your adventuring. What are you up to? 

Martin: [00:01:21] Well, I changed my name on my business card from Pilates instructor/personal trainer to movement specialist. And I feel like that kind of captures what I'm doing now, where I still do a lot of personal training, I do have my Pilates work, and also with my counseling background there's times when we're just helping people get unstuck. So in every kind of way, it really is movement. 

Beyond that, during this quarantine I've opened my Pilates studio. So there's a Pilates studio that I'm running and also running my Core Conversations podcast. So I have a few hustles going on right now. 

Olivia: [00:01:53] Awesome. So many cool things, all overlapping, I think, in really beautiful ways as well.

I would [00:02:00] love to hear from you: how did you find Pilates? What was your first experience in your very first Pilates class? 

Martin: [00:02:09] I have a background. I played football all through high school in university, and I used to come into a lot of back issues. And I went to a chiropractor- who was like, I'm still in high school. And he basically said, just stop playing football and your back will feel better. So I was like, well, you know, I'm not going to do that. So we gotta figure out another way to figure this out. 

At the same time I was going, and then I had a friend who was teaching a class at the gym, and I took that Pilates class and really enjoyed it. I noticed over time that my, you know, three times a week for the chiro became twice a week, and then became once a week, and I was like every other week, and the Pilates had become more of prehab than rehab, right? So the more Pilates I was doing, the less I needed to go to a chiropractor. 

And this isn't to knock chiropractors because there's some amazing people that do the work and understand that relationship between [00:03:00] muscle, joint, and nerves, but the guy was going to at the time didn't. So my Pilates became my own rehab. 

So I took a special interest kind of course, and a mat certification course in Pilates at that point. And I didn't really think I'd be teaching it. And then fast forward, about 10 years. And then I took a course while I was working for a big box gym. Did my comprehensive mat, reformer, Cadillac, the whole nine. 

Absolutely loved it and then recognized that there's not that many men teaching Pilates let alone, not that many, this little minority. So there's all these different opportunities that I had to get a corner on the market, so to speak. At the same time, introduce people to it and then speak to it from an athletic perspective, as opposed to like a dancer background. Not knocking dancers, but that's not me, right? So I just had to find a space where I was able to do that. I found that Pilates was the way to do it. Done an apprenticeship as well. So having to learn the classical, layering that in, as well. That's what brought me to today. 

Olivia: [00:03:55] It's incredible, and I think really valuable on so [00:04:00] many different levels because Pilates does have that reputation of being very white, of being for dancers, of being for women. And we know that's not the case. 

I think that it's incredible, especially, you know, from a representation standpoint, just seeing yourself in your teacher. I think of, you know, Jason Williams' book just came out, Frankie Does Pilates, you know and just seeing kids doing Pilates, seeing black people doing Pilates, seeing people of color, like that's really important. And we live in a wild, diverse world that isn't just one flavor or one size fits all.

Martin: [00:04:35] Right. 

Olivia: [00:04:36] Like I'm mad that you're in Canada and like far away. Cause otherwise I would go hang out in a second. 

Martin: [00:04:41] Yeah, I get that sense right? Just from our first conversation, like you've been totally fun to hang out and just talk Pilates all day.

Olivia: [00:04:47] Yes! Pilates party! 

In addition to your Pilates, and then you also have an athletic background, but what other modalities or forms of movement do you incorporate? Because I know that your [00:05:00] practice is largely therapeutic as well. What else do you weave into your Pilates-ing? 

Martin: [00:05:06] I love the word Pilates-ing. That's a great new word.

Well, my background is for sport conditioning, right? So I like performance enhancements working with athletes, whether the young athletes or professional guys, or anywhere in between. So that really is my area of passion from a personal training perspective. So that's what I brought to the Pilates, is just how do I layer that in and make Pilates that missing link for people.

So if someone comes to me and says, I want to lose weight, then I'll, you know, I'll start kind of ask questions and figure out what their goals are and how do we tie and just marry all these things together. In one way, I like diving deep on Pilates in the classical and understanding lineage and all that stuff and really being sharp with my classical Pilates. 

And there's another side that just like, that's just another tool in my toolbox overall. Right? So what is it that person needs? And we may not do Pilates for months or may not do for years, or maybe some of that we just do Pilates with and make Pilates a standalone exercise [00:06:00] system. So whatever tools we need for the person, I want to just be versatile enough to be able to provide that for them. 

Olivia: [00:06:05] That's incredible. And that's something I've seen like in other teachers that I've talked with and I'm sure in Core Conversations, you've talked to so many amazing, incredible teachers that it really is about having this toolbox. And Pilates is an incredible tool, but it's not the only way to work with people or like the only language of movement that you can use when you're working with people. 

What advice do you have for teachers who are maybe just getting started teaching or maybe have been teaching a long time? What is the secret sauce that makes your adventure go?

Martin: [00:06:42] That's a great way of asking that. I would recommend that they take a personal training course. Get a deeper understanding of movement and levers and muscles and how they fire and fascia and all those different things. So you have a better understanding of the whole human body in different modalities and layer that in. If [00:07:00] you really want to get into the work of helping people get and reach their potential, correct exercise, and those sorts of things, I mean that personal trainer layer and really helps. 

On either end, as a personal trainer, I say, take your Pilates course, cause it'll make your cues better. You'll have a different idea. You know what I mean? 

So the more tools you get in your toolbox, the better. And I heard some, I will say this, the other day, the best thing a Pilates instructor can do for their practice is take another workshop that has nothing to do with Pilates. Go learn what a dead lift workshop is like, what a squat workshop is like, or a functional movement screen is like. Add different layers, add different pieces to your toolbox and just be as versatile as possible.

Olivia: [00:07:37] I loved something that you said when we were talking on Core Conversations. And that was that your teacher training is really like your driver's license. It is definitely going to let you get on the road, but it's not going to let you drive a semi or race people. You referenced someone who I was like- that's great. I have no idea who that is. 

Martin: [00:07:59] Yeah, [00:08:00] just smiled and nodded to them. 

Olivia: [00:08:01] I was just like, yeah, sure. I bet he drives fast cars. Um, but just that idea that it's starting point. It's not a finish line. And there's so much and so many layers and the more things you have to offer as a teacher, even if you're teaching in like a quote Pilates studio, if you know how to incorporate those biomechanics. I know some of the work you do is with athletes and with men who that might be the vocabulary that really connects with your students as you're teaching them. 

Martin: [00:08:30] Absolutely have to look at it from that perspective. You want to be able to have your niche, obviously, and everyone has someone that they're most passionate to work with, but if you've been in industry for any amount of time, you know that you're going to spend 20% of your time with your favorite people, and then you have to be able to address the rest of the people that come across your table. Right? 

So as much as I want to work with guys going to the NBA all day, I'm going to have people who have a general fitness goal, and they have an injury, and they have [00:09:00] diabetes, and their doctor said that they have to work on their heart health. So what do we do with our Pilates for that? Right? Understanding every angle that you might have to face, to be able to be ready for that is really helpful. 

Olivia: [00:09:11] Are there any people who, I mean, maybe once upon a time they showed up on your doorstep, but maybe now virtually they show up on your doorstep and you know, you're talking with them, you know, that Pilates is going to be a good fit for them.

And maybe you do a session or two, and they're really resistant to maybe how Pilates works or like how slow Pilates can be or those things. What advice do you have for teachers who are trying to navigate? We're teachers, we think Pilates is great, but for someone who you have to like sell a little bit, like how do you bridge that gap?

Martin: [00:09:45] We have to bridge it by just helping the people to feel good at the end of the session. I feel like there's this continuum, where at the beginning, I may make 95% of the workout a feel good workout. So they get to feel freer, taller, more [00:10:00] range of motion in the joints, all that stuff. And then as we progress, then we can make it 50% of feel good workout. And then we can make it like hard for 70% of the time and then the last 30% of the workout, we can make it so they could forget about the pain I just incurred on them in the last little while. 

There's just this progression of letting them feel good and letting them see progress. And then for us to be really, really observant of what we see right at the beginning. So then as they progressed over the days, weeks, and months, we could say, Hey, remember that roll up that you hated me for like six weeks ago, you just killed that. We're looking at this other piece of the workout. We're not even addressing the piece that was a struggle for you. Or did you notice that? 

So we need to be able to be observant and just keep that language of celebrating their progress and keep them feeling good the whole time. And then over time, they'll get to a place where they're noticing it, when their friends and family and noticing that their posture looks better or their stomach's a little bit more in, or they don't hold onto a handrail while they're walking down the stairs anymore. The more observant we are, the more we can [00:11:00] celebrate their small victories along the way.

Olivia: [00:11:03] But it's definitely like that. I love celebrating those successes. That you kind of like sneak things in as they grow. Because you see their body language change. Like you said, you get taller, more confident, like you carry yourself differently and you just like sneak it in. 

Martin: [00:11:19] Yeah, exactly. A friend of mine said we have these sneaky ninja skills, right? Like, so you give them what they need while addressing what they want. So they may say that we just want to stretch today. You're like, okay, fine. We'll just, we'll just do a few stretches. And then you just slide in with the ab series of five. And just when they're about to get mad at you, you do another stretch to make them feel good again. Right? So you slip them in wherever you can. 

And you'll find, Olivia, I'm just thinking about like the name of my business overall. I had my, the company that I opened in 2002, it was called Personal Victory. So that's kinda like my parent company and the Reid Method Pilates studio is part of that, Core Conversation podcast is a part of that, and whatever else I'm doing, just kind of falls under that. 

Simply because [00:12:00] that's what it's about is for us to celebrate those personal victories. Not everyone is going to be in the Olympics and not going to have a podium finish. But a podium finish may be someone being able to play with their grandkids all day and not have to spend a day in bed afterwards. Right? Like that podium finish may be for that person will move soil from the front of the house to the back of the house, by themselves all weekend gardening and then not have a sore back the next day. Like we train for those moments. So those are those personal victories that I want to give people an opportunity to experience in our lives.

Olivia: [00:12:31] That's so beautiful and so inspiring and I think so true too. The heart of Pilates, like I know reading Caged Lion, and then seeing some of the interviews with the author, John Howard Steel, that his memories of Joe was that he just cared so deeply for people. And, you know, we think of classical as being like really rigid and really strict, but that there's so much that you can explore within the method that there are so [00:13:00] many options and modifications and variations that you can make it work for that grandparent who wants to play with their kids. And you can also make it work for your NBA player who is seeing you for cross training or to rehab or something like that. 

Martin: [00:13:16] Absolutely. Sorry, I was thinking about like, we just said like rigid and strict. You know, as a parent there's times when I really need to be rigid and strict, because it's in my child's best interest for me to give them some boundaries and some guidelines and some framework to move safely within for their own success. Being rigid and strict is something that I feel is sometimes needed, right? So like our classical work gets framed like that. Or Joseph Pilates, you know, appeared like that. 

But yes, there's such a passion and a compassion you have for people as a trainer. I feel like sometimes I have to catch myself because I almost want someone's goals for them more than they want it for themselves. I don't know if you've ever felt like that, but they just times where you just know that they're so [00:14:00] close to this breakthrough, if they just keep showing up or just try a little harder, or they just give that exercise that something of like one more effort. There's that element of that. And I see that just, and it comes from us wanting the best for our people, right. 

Olivia: [00:14:12] It's definitely been a process for me as I've been teaching just more bodies and more people and learning more about Pilates. And then also other modalities that when we say things like teach the body in front of you, sometimes that's a body that doesn't want to be there or is really grumpy or they're there because they didn't want to get the late cancellation charge, you know? And that happens sometimes. 

You know, you just do what you can and you keep showing up and you keep being your amazing, positive self. I just know from talking with you and know from your podcast, that you are just really your client's biggest fan and just like wanting the absolute best for them at all times. And you just keep believing in them even when they don't believe in them. 

Martin: [00:14:56] Right. 

Olivia: [00:14:58] That's the work. 

Martin: [00:14:59] That's the work. [00:15:00] You just captured it right there. That's exactly what we do every day, all day.

Olivia: [00:15:09] Hi there. I hope you're enjoying today's chapter so far. There's great stuff coming up after the break too. Be sure to subscribe wherever you're listening and visit buymeacoffee.com/OliviaPodcasts to support the show. There you can make a one-time donation or become a member for as little as $5 a month.

Membership comes with some awesome perks, including a shout out in the next episode, a monthly newsletter, a monthly zoom call with me and more. You can also visit links.OliviaBioni.com/affiliates to check out some sweet deals on products I use and love. Now back to the show.

I want to [00:16:00] come back to your work around Real Men do Pilates and Pilates for men, because I know that that's your niche, your passion, like really where your heart is. Can you tell me more about that adventure and how that continues? 

Martin: [00:16:20] Absolutely. The Real Men do Pilates piece has become a little bit of a dialogue lately, too. I think we'll spend a little more time talking about that, but in its origin, I thought of real men do Pilates because I'd seen some other people using the phrase. And it just really resonated with me because you think of men and exercise, you think of squats, deadlifts, bench press, you think of any kind of grunt, heavy load, overload type exercise.

So if we're in that place of doing those types of exercises all the time, then we're missing opportunities to actually enjoy our lives. Right? Cause your injury bound or your back's all jacked up, whatever. When I discovered that Pilates was the [00:17:00] game changer for me recognize that 1) from injury perspective, it was helping.

And 2) it's also helping performance wise because now my gait's better when I sprint or I have more rotation to catch a football, or I can do a Euro step in a certain way, those types of movements, and now open, accessible to me because my body isn't as tight. 

Real men do Pilates. They can get over any kind of idea that is just for dancers, it's just for women, it's just for yummy mummies doing exercise in the middle of the day or whatever you want to say. Those are the lines that got thrown at Pilates. And it's like, well, no, this is for people who are curious about how they can do more with their body. People who are uninhibited, like they're not worried about what people think about them in doing something different to be able to get to their podium performance. And they really want to just feel better about themselves. So if you can get over that stoic machismo, old school, man mentality to find what your body is capable of doing, that's truly [00:18:00] what Real Men do Pilates means. 

So I would throw up posts of me doing stuff like doing crazy exercises. And I, you know, I put a post to me like no shirt on. I was like, this is a guy doing Pilates. At that point, it got to a place where I really didn't care what people thought of me anymore. I just wanted to throw stuff out there, to hit it from every angle. So people can see that this is just a guy doing Pilates. 

And it doesn't have to be someone who was in the national ballet at one point in his life. He's a guy who played football, who is tight as you were tight, who wants to be able to run with the kids forever, who wants to dominate at flag football on the weekend. And he needs Pilates and you do too. 

Olivia: [00:18:39] I think even more powerful coming from you with that background, because I can say that until I'm blue in the face, but it's just not going to connect with people the same way.

Martin: [00:18:51] Right. 

Olivia: [00:18:52] I love that you have this platform and that you have these conversations also on your Instagram with other male Pilates teachers and [00:19:00] just really showing the benefits. And you know that it's for everyone like everyone, including you. 

Martin: [00:19:06] Yes. And also it's not just real men do Pilates isn't necessarily to point people to me, it's for someone like you, Olivia, where you can say, look, here's a guy doing Pilates. Like, I am now a reference for you to say, look, here's proof that guys do Pilates. Because who was there before me? Right? There's like maybe one or two other guys that you can name before I started to put a lot of that stuff out there. And it's not to say like, I'm all that. I just want to be just another point of reference for people to be able to say, look, to some woman that you have working with you who's trying to get her husband to do Pilates: "Go look at this guy's Instagram. There's a guy doing Pilates and you can do it too." Right? 

Olivia: [00:19:45] A hundred percent. It's so interesting. One of my very first clients when I was an apprentice teacher, which like I shudder to think what my cues were like when I just came out of teacher training, was a gentleman who was, you know, a little bit [00:20:00] older, was a professor.

And I don't want to say I was lost because I had, you know, I'd also taught men. There were men in my teacher training program, which I know not everyone gets to work with. And it felt, coming from a yoga background as well, that like the language that I was using wasn't connecting. That he wanted just like a really tough workout. Didn't care about progressions. Just wanted a new thing every time. 

Martin: [00:20:24] Yes. 

Olivia: [00:20:25] And I'm also, as nervous as I was when that first started, I'm also so thankful to have that person as a client. I don't want to say that every guy you work with is going to be like that, but there is a section of population that's like, I just want to get a good workout and I don't care about the principles. I just want to do hard things, like in quotes, like I want to do "hard things." 

I think what you said about being a sneaky ninja and being like, okay, yeah, we'll do those things and we'll incorporate free weights into footwork and we'll do all these [00:21:00] push-up variations in long stretch that you want to do. But we're also going to stretch your hamstrings because that's what I know you need in terms of putting your shoes on every day. 

Finding that balance where Pilates, I imagine personal training is like this as well, where they have goals that are theirs. You have things that- you're going to meet their goals, but you also know that like, this is where I want to nudge you, and you meet in the middle. It's a conversation. Like you have to find a way to connect with each person, both men doing Pilates and anyone doing Pilates. 

Martin: [00:21:34] Absolutely. 

And the other layer to this, which came up when I started to talk more about this real men do Pilates piece as I was speaking with different people on the show, people in the gay community, people in the trans community, that broaden the conversation to talk about what is "real" mean, what does "real" look like? What does "men" look like? 

When I had Joshua Keith come on and asked him what that meant to him from his background, growing up in the South [00:22:00] as a gay man and just the daggers that are thrown at you from that perspective. When he presented what real men looks like, he said it better than me. What it comes down to, it's not just a question of how you look or how you act as well as how you think, how you behave from that perspective. 

And I love that. And it's like, I asked him if I could repost that because it meant a lot to me to hear someone echo my heart with it. When I say, I don't want it to just be about the physical look of men-ness, you know what I'm saying? Like, I want it to be the authenticity of, like I said, just getting better in your movement practice, being courageous and curious and what that looks like. Not being concerned about other people's opinions of what you're doing, what you're trying. 

When he said it, I think that almost adds a little bit more validity to it than me, seeing it as a straight male saying, because then people will start to accuse me of being well, you're saying that from where you stand, that's probably going to be a toxic masculinity thing if he [00:23:00] says it. 

But when Joshua says it, and he's saying what I want to say, and he's amplifying my voice and I'm amplifying his voice, then that broadens the conversation and lets us all be in a place where we can celebrate men that do Pilates. 

Any way you slice it, guys aren't doing it. And guys need to do it.

Olivia: [00:23:17] It's so true. I think, like you said, just getting it out there as many ways that you can, because you never know, especially with Instagram's algorithm, like you never know when your post is going to show up on somebody's feed and sometimes you're scrolling and that's what you need to hear. 

And maybe you've had a bunch of injuries and you are tired of being in pain. Like that happens a lot, especially if you're playing contact sports. When I was like in high school and middle school, I played soccer. I was having knee stuff. I'm like 16 years old and I'm like rehabbing knee injuries. And I was like, this seems terrible. If I had seen someone being like, Hey, you know, you don't have to be in pain or there's a better way [00:24:00] to move and it's not what you think. Like it's not running more laps, which was like my coach's response to everything. 

Martin: [00:24:06] Just walk it off.

Olivia: [00:24:07] Yeah, walk it off. Exactly. Rub some dirt in it. And that is really tough. That didn't speak to me, but this language of Pilates and especially the type of Pilates that I know you teach just from talking with you, that your clients have autonomy, that they're able to, you know, make choices. And they're able to, you know, if they're not ready to do something, even when you're like, Oh, I know you could do this. They also set the pace. This is like a safe place for them to explore. And I like to think of it as surprising themselves, where you set the stage and then they get to be the star of the show.

Martin: [00:24:42] Absolutely. Yeah. I love that. Lori Coleman-Brown was saying like, you just move, move, move pounce, right? Move, move, move pounce. Like you just let them just go. Let them just move freely around what they know. And then jump on them when there's something that you could just refine so they can get a better [00:25:00] connection and let them go and then jump in again when you could just make it just a little bit deeper, you know, whatever it is. Right. I like that flow. And she captured that for me, where it's like, okay. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. And that's exactly what I'm already doing. 

Olivia: [00:25:14] My teacher trainer called them chewable doables. You just sprinkle a chewable doable, and maybe you've been cuing neutral spine for a year and they're not quite getting it, but you just sprinkle it in.

Maybe they get it this time. Maybe they get it next time. But you're like constantly planting seeds for growth because it's not linear. Wish it was linear. Some people, it connects right away. Some people, you do the same stuff for years and years, and that's what they need. 

And that may not be what you need. And that's why I think it's so important that you keep doing Pilates and moving with Pilates for yourself. Cause we're always learning new things. Whether you go to a workshop or whether you try something new on the tower, it's going to be something you can share. 

[00:26:00] Martin: [00:26:00] Yeah, it's an exciting journey in that way. Right.

And also, you know what you were saying earlier, we have such a great hope and expectation for our students. And we also have, they said the fact that there may be some exercises, they'll just never figure out. And then we need you to kind of let go and move on and find that somewhere else in the work.

That's the beauty of the classical work too. Right? I love how we've been taught the different connections and ask those hard questions, like where else can I find this movement pattern in the work for this person? They can't figure this out here. It's gotta be somewhere else. So start searching.

Olivia: [00:26:33] Especially where I am in Hyde Park has a much older population as well. It's a lot of retired professors. It's a lot of people affiliated with the University of Chicago. I'm working with clients who are in their seventies and eighties. Like they're not going to do the rollover. They don't need to do the rollover, but yeah, we can find ways to build strength and to help them feel confident and strong in like, not the rollover kind of way.

Tell me what [00:27:00] you are working on right now. Is there anything that people can support or follow or, you know, adventure? 

Martin: [00:27:08] Yeah, absolutely. The main thing that I'm focusing on right now is the Core Conversations podcast. I'm enjoying that. That's like the highlight of my days just doing these Instagram lives, like 10 o'clock every weekday.

I told my wife three months ago that once, you know, the summer ends, that we'll shut her down when I run out of guests. And I'm booked like through the end of the year. It's just amazing how that's been growing and the voices, the people I'm meeting, the different ways I'm learning. It's awesome. That's the main thing.

If I can get more people listening and discovering the superheroes that are out there in our Pilates community, the better. It's not even necessarily like, I want to make a million dollars, I need to have like Joe Rogan level of followers. But if people understood how amazing the guests are that I see five days a week, and that gets converted [00:28:00] to a podcast that people get to shop their instructors by hearing the life story of Olivia who loves plants behind me. Right? 

Like that sort of thing is what connects people to the community and helps people understand where their trainer is out there in the whole world. And the world is really small with all, everything virtual now, too. So it becomes the platform and the voice, and just a way to connect with the amazing people that are in our community and beyond. So if you could just like subscribe and share, that will be amazing. 

Olivia: [00:28:29] I think it's incredible. Hats off to you, my friend, because five days a week, that's- I want to say crazy, but it's like beyond crazy. It's just like incredible. It's a feat. And now it's like, your normal because you've been doing it for several months, but still like, if you go through and watch either my conversation or literally conversations with anyone else you've ever spoken to in the duration of your show, you really are spotlighting, maybe incredible people that you've heard of that have their own membership site, [00:29:00] that they're on Pilates Anytime, or like they're big in the Pilates world, but also really just like great people who aren't famous, but are still doing incredible work in their communities and in the Pilates world.

I think that you have a really awesome thing on your hands and just to like build this network, this incredible uplifting and powerful Pilates community. I love it. 

Martin: [00:29:26] Thank you. And the thing too with that, Olivia, is that, like it's me flowing in my gift and that's why I don't think it's an amazing feat to do this five days a week. Because there are things that you do that I would never be able to do that or I would put a pencil in my eye because that is so boring. So, whatever it is about the things that we do that we're gifted and talented to do, what we're doing it and we're flowing in that gift. It's effortless for the person flowing in that gift. And it looks like it's work and it looks like it's the task because that's not your gift. Right. 

So if I'm flowing in my gifts [00:30:00] and it's easy, not that there's not challenges, there's definitely challenges with this. And I've got shot down a couple of times early, but you start to recognize that as you do it and then people start to give you the affirmation and it just comes so easy to do. And people keep saying yes. This is where you're supposed to be, so it's not hard. It really is easy when you're flowing your gift. 

So I really just encourage everyone, teachers or students out there. Spend some time trying to craft what it is that you're most passionate about and that intersection of what you love to do and what you're really good at and just run with that.

Olivia: [00:30:33] That's really true. And it's easy when you're doing it to take it for granted, because like you said, it's so easy for you. You're just flowing, like of course I can do this. But it's so important because just the fact that you have this gift and that you're choosing to share it instead of just like locking away all of your awesomeness. So thank you for sharing that and for sharing that gift, because I think the entire Pilates [00:31:00] community benefits just by having these affirming stories. 

You know, we have groups on Facebook and we have groups on Instagram and we reach out to each other, but really to just see these behind the business and behind the professional and to really hear people's stories. Sometimes beyond even Pilates, like that there's this whole person that you may connect with totally differently when they aren't being their: well, now we're doing the hundred face, you know. 

Martin: [00:31:27] Their perfect polished person. Yeah. That's exactly it. Like I say the man behind the brand or the woman behind the brand. That's what we want to see. 

Even here, like this is, we didn't even really get into the studio as much as to say, like, this is a micro-business. So within the studio, I have my studio here and then there's Andrew Soltari, who is the owner of it, and he's running his business. So in the background, I'm sure you've heard like a baby and then you hear all these different noises in the background because we're doing life here together, right? Like we have a clinic, he has a young child and wife's [00:32:00] here. And we're just trying to figure all these things out and just navigate all this stuff and just be humans. Not trying to be perfectly polished, impeccable, error-free humans, but just humans trying to figure this work out. Right. 

And that's all part of being the man behind the brand. Like not just having this perfect polished site and, you know, everything is pristine in the background. So I apologize for all the background noise too. I know we need like dead silence for podcasts. But this is quarantine life, right? Like these things happen.

Olivia: [00:32:30] And that's just how it is right now and that's fine. Is there anything else that you'd like to add or that you want to throw in the mix? 

Martin: [00:32:37] I think so. This is fun. I think you're doing a great job. Like just your two podcasts and you're filling a great void as well. You know, we talk about passions and the things that are easy. When we recognize that there are those gaps and those opportunities to help the community, we're all doing great work.

So I just want to say, like, I just really appreciate you and the work that you're doing, and I'm looking forward to working more with you. [00:33:00] Like there's so many opportunities for us to continue to grow concurrently. This isn't a battle, this isn't a competition, you know, and if we want to race to have the most followers we can, but if I can amplify what you're doing, you can amplify what I'm doing, we both win. 

I think, you know, as students and as teachers in this work, the more that we recognize that we have more in common than things that are different on, and our competition is a healthy competition to make each other better. That translates to everyday life, whether it's race, gender issues, sexuality, whatever, like we all coming from a place of being humans and just trying to be better every day. 

Olivia: [00:33:38] Well, I'm not sure exactly what the Canadian contingent is that listens to my podcast. But if you're in Ontario, is it Ontario? 

Martin: [00:33:46] Oh, it's Mississauga. Mississauga's my city, and Ontario is a state, like California. This state, we call them provinces in Canada. There's a geography. And, uh, so Mississauga, Ontario, in Canada. So just outside of Toronto. 

Olivia: [00:33:59] Definitely [00:34:00] go check him out because you're incredible. And I really am so glad to have met you. This is fan freaking tastic.

Thank you so, so much for being on the show. And I hope to speak to you again very soon, Martin. 

Martin: [00:34:14] Thank you so much.

Olivia: [00:34:23] Thanks for listening to this week's chapter of Pilates Teachers' Manual, your guide to becoming a great Pilates teacher. Check out the podcast Instagram at @pilatesteachersmanual and be sure to subscribe wherever you listen. For more Pilates goodness, check out my other podcast, Pilates Students' Manual, available everywhere you listen to podcasts.

The adventure continues. Until next time.



Welcome
Finding Pilates
Advice for Teachers
Working with Resistant Clients
Origins of Personal Victory
Real Men Do Pilates
Core Conversations
Flowing in Your Gift